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goal

[gohl]
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noun
  1. the result or achievement toward which effort is directed; aim; end.
  2. the terminal point in a race.
  3. a pole, line, or other marker by which such a point is indicated.
  4. an area, basket, cage, or other object or structure toward or into which players of various games attempt to throw, carry, kick, hit, or drive a ball, puck, etc., to score a point or points.
  5. the act of throwing, carrying, kicking, driving, etc., a ball or puck into such an area or object.
  6. the score made by this act.

Origin of goal

1275–1325; Middle English gol boundary, limit; compare Old English gǣlan to hinder, impede
Related formsgoal·less, adjectivesub·goal, noun

Synonyms

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1. target; purpose, object, objective, intent, intention. 2. finish.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018
British Dictionary definitions for subgoal

goal

noun
  1. the aim or object towards which an endeavour is directed
  2. the terminal point of a journey or race
  3. (in various sports) the net, basket, etc into or over which players try to propel the ball, puck, etc, to score
  4. sport
    1. a successful attempt at scoring
    2. the score so made
  5. (in soccer, hockey, etc) the position of goalkeeper
Derived Formsgoalless, adjective

Word Origin

C16: perhaps related to Middle English gol boundary, Old English gǣlan to hinder, impede
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for subgoal

goal

n.

1530s, "end point of a race," of uncertain origin. The noun gol appears once before this, in a poem from early 14c. and with an apparent sense of "boundary, limit." Perhaps from Old English *gal "obstacle, barrier," a word implied by gælan "to hinder." Or from Old French gaule "a pole," from Germanic; or a figurative use of Middle English gale "a way, course." Sports sense of "place where the ball is put to score" is attested from 1540s. Figurative sense of "object of an effort" is from 1540s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper