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subjection

[suh b-jek-shuh n] /səbˈdʒɛk ʃən/
noun
1.
the act of subjecting.
2.
the state or fact of being subjected.
Origin of subjection
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English < Latin subjectiōn- (stem of subjectiō) a throwing under, equivalent to subject- (see subject) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
subjectional, adjective
nonsubjection, noun
presubjection, noun
resubjection, noun
self-subjection, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for subjection
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • (b) A subjection of her self, her appetites and will to her husband and his will.

  • His sovereign himself he held in subjection, while he exalted the throne.

  • These people are neighbours of the Assyrians, and being few in number, they were held in subjection.

    Cyropaedia Xenophon
  • "Then I shall do as your uncle wishes me to do—reduce you to subjection," said he.

    Breaking Away Oliver Optic
  • Your uncle wished me to reduce you to subjection, and to flog you till you came to your senses.

    Breaking Away Oliver Optic
  • "I intend to reduce you to subjection at any hazard," he added.

    Breaking Away Oliver Optic
  • Then you did request Mr. Parasyte to reduce me to subjection, as he expressed it?

    Breaking Away Oliver Optic
  • What did Parasyte mean when he said your uncle wished him to flog you into subjection?

    Breaking Away Oliver Optic
  • Mr. Parasyte intended to deprive us of our food, and starve us into subjection.

    Breaking Away Oliver Optic
British Dictionary definitions for subjection

subjection

/səbˈdʒɛkʃən/
noun
1.
the act or process of subjecting or the state of being subjected
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for subjection
n.

mid-14c., from Old French subjection (12c.), from Latin subjectionem (nominative subjectio), noun of action from past participle stem of subicere (see subject (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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