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succoth

or succot, succos

[Sephardic Hebrew soo-kawt; Ashkenazic Hebrew soo-kohs] /Sephardic Hebrew suˈkɔt; Ashkenazic Hebrew sʊˈkoʊs/
noun, Hebrew.
1.
a plural of succah.

Succoth

or Succot, Succos

[Sephardic Hebrew soo-kawt; Ashkenazic Hebrew, English soo -kuh s, soo-kohs] /Sephardic Hebrew suˈkɔt; Ashkenazic Hebrew, English ˈsʊ kəs, suˈkoʊs/
noun, Judaism.
1.

succah

[Sephardic Hebrew soo-kah; Ashkenazic Hebrew, English soo k-uh] /Sephardic Hebrew suˈkɑ; Ashkenazic Hebrew, English ˈsʊk ə/
noun, plural succoth, succot, succos
[Sephardic Hebrew soo-kawt; Ashkenazic Hebrew soo-kohs] /Sephardic Hebrew suˈkɔt; Ashkenazic Hebrew sʊˈkoʊs/ (Show IPA).
English, succahs. Hebrew.
1.

sukkah

or succah

[Sephardic Hebrew soo-kah; Ashkenazic Hebrew, English soo k-uh] /Sephardic Hebrew suˈkɑ; Ashkenazic Hebrew, English ˈsʊk ə/
noun, plural sukkoth, sukkot, sukkos
[Sephardic Hebrew soo-kawt; Ashkenazic Hebrew soo-kohs] /Sephardic Hebrew suˈkɔt; Ashkenazic Hebrew sʊˈkoʊs/ (Show IPA).
English, sukkahs. Hebrew.
1.
a booth or hut roofed with branches, built against or near a house or synagogue and used during the Jewish festival of Sukkoth as a temporary dining or living area.
Origin of sukkah
sukkāh literally, booth
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for succoth
Historical Examples
  • And they went from succoth and camped at Etham on the border of the wilderness.

    The Children's Bible Henry A. Sherman
  • So they must have remained in succoth or have turned southward.

    Joshua, Complete Georg Ebers
  • The Egyptian localities, at least Rameses and succoth, are known.

  • And they took their journey from succoth, and encamped in Etham, in the edge of the wilderness.

  • With thorns and briars of the wilderness he scourges the elders of succoth.

    Judges and Ruth Robert A. Watson
  • Yet where do we see the lowest point of unfaith and meanness, in Ephraim or succoth?

    Judges and Ruth Robert A. Watson
  • The position of Ramses has been identified; that of succoth is more questionable.

  • Now, succoth was evidently not his divinely-appointed destination.

    Notes on the Book of Genesis Charles Henry Mackintosh
  • Yet there was someone who moved first when they marched from Rameses to succoth.

    Practical Religion

    John Charles Ryle
  • Toward sunrise, or at latest by the noon-tide hour, the tribes will tarry to rest at succoth.

    Joshua, Complete Georg Ebers
British Dictionary definitions for succoth

Succoth

/ˈsʊkəʊt; -kəʊθ; Hebrew suːˈkɔt/
noun
1.
a variant spelling of Sukkoth

succah

/suˈkɑ; ˈsukɔ; ˈsukə/
noun
1.
(Judaism) a variant spelling of sukkah

sukkah

/suˈkɑ; ˈsukɔ; ˈsukə/
noun
1.
a temporary structure with a roof of branches in which orthodox Jews eat and, if possible, sleep during the festival of Sukkoth Also called tabernacle
Word Origin
from Hebrew, literally: tabernacle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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