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amiss

[uh-mis] /əˈmɪs/
adverb
1.
out of the right or proper course, order, or condition; improperly; wrongly; astray:
Did I speak amiss?
adjective, (usually used predicatively)
2.
improper; wrong; faulty:
I think something is amiss in your calculations.
Idioms
3.
take amiss, to be offended at or resentful of (something not meant to cause offense or resentment); misunderstand:
I couldn't think of a way to present my view so that no one would take it amiss.
Origin of amiss
1200-1250
1200-50; Middle English amis, equivalent to a- a-1 + mis wrong. See miss1
Synonyms
1. inappropriately, unsuitably. 2. mistaken, erroneous; awry, askew.
Antonyms
1. rightly, properly. 2. correct, true.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for take amiss
Historical Examples
  • On my honour as a gentleman, I will never say another word that you can take amiss.

    Is He Popenjoy?

    Anthony Trollope
  • "Dear Johanna, you must not take amiss what he says," Helena began, with a furtive smile.

    A Noble Name Claire Von Glmer
  • I hope you did not take amiss my declining your visit yesterday.

    Clarissa, Volume 5 (of 9) Samuel Richardson
  • Curlydown was a strictly hospitable man, and in his own house would not appear to take amiss anything his guest might say.

    John Caldigate

    Anthony Trollope
  • If ever I am in rough water and foul weather, I hope he will not take amiss anything I have here written about him.

    Saunterings Charles Dudley Warner
  • I only hope that if ever anything of all this is published they will not take amiss anything written herein.

    The Secrets of a Kuttite Edward O. Mousley
  • I afterwards told him my opinion of this species of prayer, which however, he did not take amiss.

    Travels in England in 1782 Charles P. Moritz
  • Who could take amiss the rebuke of the kindly satirist, who was so ready to show up his own weaknesses?

    Horace Theodore Martin
  • "Then I advise you to go and do likewise," rejoined his new friend with a geniality impossible to take amiss.

    The Thousandth Woman Ernest W. Hornung
  • It would clearly be impossible to take amiss anything that this woman might choose to say.

British Dictionary definitions for take amiss

amiss

/əˈmɪs/
adverb
1.
in an incorrect, inappropriate, or defective manner
2.
take something amiss, to be annoyed or offended by something
adjective
3.
(postpositive) wrong, incorrect, or faulty
Word Origin
C13 a mis, from mis wrong; see miss1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for take amiss

amiss

adv.

mid-13c., amis "off the mark," also "out of order," literally "on the miss," from a "in, on" (see a- (1)) + missen "fail to hit" (see miss (v.)). To take (something) amiss originally (late 14c.) was "to miss the meaning of" (see mistake). Now it means "to misinterpret in a bad sense."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with take amiss

take amiss

amiss

see under take the wrong way
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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