Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

The Best Internet Slang

tearaway

[tair-uh-wey] /ˈtɛər əˌweɪ/
adjective
1.
designed to be easily separated or opened by tearing:
a box with a tearaway seal.
noun
2.
British. a wild, reckless person.
Origin of tearaway
1825-1835
First recorded in 1825-35; adj., noun use of verb phrase tear away
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for tearaway
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I say, Fred, I've backed 'tearaway,' would you have me hedge off?

  • I'll give you chaps a tip—have a shilling or two on tearaway.

    Fast as the Wind Nat Gould
  • Ripon held the lead, Bronze next, Harriet and tearaway level.

    Fast as the Wind Nat Gould
  • Another roar was given for tearaway; the others were all cheered lustily.

    Fast as the Wind Nat Gould
  • Ripon was going well, but could not keep the pace with tearaway.

    Fast as the Wind Nat Gould
  • The Rascal and tearaway were the pets of the Haverton stable.

    Fast as the Wind Nat Gould
  • "After tearaway has had her trial with Tristram," said Hector.

    Fast as the Wind Nat Gould
  • How could tearaway be expected to beat him at a difference of only seven pounds?

    Fast as the Wind Nat Gould
  • tearaway was in the rear, Erickson keeping close behind Tristram.

    Fast as the Wind Nat Gould

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for tearaway

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for tearaway

0
13
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for tearaway