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Word Origin and History for tyrrhenian

Tyrrhenian

1650s, "pertaining to the Etruscans," from Latin Tyrrheni, from Greek Tyrrenoi "Tyrrhenians," from tyrsis "tower, walled city" (cf. Latin turris "tower"). Earlier Tyrrhene (late 14c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Examples from the Web for tyrrhenian

Historical Examples

  • Day was dying; the sun sank, blood-red, into the Tyrrhenian sea.

    Quintus Claudius, Volume 2 of 2

    Ernst Eckstein

  • An island in the Tyrrhenian sea, opposite to the Gulf of Gaeta.

  • Your Tyrrhenian father did not beget you to be as inaccessible as Penelope to your wooers.

  • The charms of the Tyrrhenian Sea have been sung since the days of Homer.

    The Wing-and-Wing

    J. Fenimore Cooper

  • The rising tide tends toward the north, from the Ionian to the Tyrrhenian sea, and the falling tide in the opposite direction.


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