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unduly

[uhn-doo-lee, -dyoo-] /ʌnˈdu li, -ˈdyu-/
adverb
1.
excessively:
unduly worried.
2.
in an inappropriate, unjustifiable, or improper manner:
unduly critical.
Origin of unduly
1350-1400
First recorded in 1350-1400, unduly is from the Middle English word undewely. See undue, -ly
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for unduly
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He was convinced by what she told him that both Lloyd and her mother were unduly alarmed.

    The Little Colonel Annie Fellows Johnston
  • He will not be puffed up by success, or unduly depressed by failure.

    Self-Help Samuel Smiles
  • Meantime, he counselled the public to be not unduly alarmed.

    Ruggles of Red Gap Harry Leon Wilson
  • The digestive organs are weakened by illness, and should not be unduly taxed.

    The Skilful Cook Mary Harrison
  • Of course, my dear sir, you understand that I am not unduly curious.

    Fair Harbor

    Joseph Crosby Lincoln
  • When he spoke, it was with no trace of consciousness that the question had been unduly intimate.

    The Market-Place Harold Frederic
  • Some of its votaries, on the other hand, are inclined to exalt it unduly.

British Dictionary definitions for unduly

unduly

/ʌnˈdjuːlɪ/
adverb
1.
immoderately; excessively
2.
in contradiction of moral or legal standards
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unduly
adj.

late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + duly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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10
13
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