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2017 Word of the Year

unearth

[uhn-urth] /ʌnˈɜrθ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to dig or get out of the earth; dig up.
2.
to uncover or bring to light by search, inquiry, etc.:
The lawyer unearthed new evidence.
Origin of unearth
late Middle English
1400-1450
First recorded in 1400-50, unearth is from the late Middle English word unerthen. See un-2, earth
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for unearth
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He knew every corner of it, and he intended to unearth Meg and the children if they were to be found.

    Jan and Her Job L. Allen Harker
  • "There's nothing to unearth, papa," said the younger daughter.

    Tony Butler Charles James Lever
  • Hogs often unearth and consume most of the seeds needed for a good growth.

    Agriculture for Beginners Charles William Burkett
  • But admitting that he could unearth anything about her, could he write the life of a saint?

    En Route

    J.-K. (Joris-Karl) Huysmans
  • Then, poor fellow, we must unearth his body and lay it in the hut, covering him up.

    Across the Spanish Main Harry Collingwood
British Dictionary definitions for unearth

unearth

/ʌnˈɜːθ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to dig up out of the earth
2.
to reveal or discover, esp by exhaustive searching
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unearth
v.

"to dig up," mid-15c., from un- (2) + earth (v.) "to bury in the ground" (see earth). Related: Unearthed; unearthing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for unearth

10
11
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