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2017 Word of the Year

unearth

[uhn-urth] /ʌnˈɜrθ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to dig or get out of the earth; dig up.
2.
to uncover or bring to light by search, inquiry, etc.:
The lawyer unearthed new evidence.
Origin of unearth
late Middle English
1400-1450
First recorded in 1400-50, unearth is from the late Middle English word unerthen. See un-2, earth
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for unearthed
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Haggerty lifted a rock which they had unearthed and thrown to one side.

    The Great Drought Sterner St. Paul Meek
  • She had unearthed her check book, and was writing words and figures as angular as herself.

    Rope Holworthy Hall
  • I took a musty volume from Allen Clinton, which he had unearthed from its resting-place.

    A Master of Mysteries L. T. Meade
  • Indeed, he had been unearthed from a midnight carouse at a questionable restaurant.

    The Minister of Evil William Le Queux
  • After another quarter of an hour's work Barbados unearthed a bottle.

    The Pirate of Panama William MacLeod Raine
British Dictionary definitions for unearthed

unearth

/ʌnˈɜːθ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to dig up out of the earth
2.
to reveal or discover, esp by exhaustive searching
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unearthed

unearth

v.

"to dig up," mid-15c., from un- (2) + earth (v.) "to bury in the ground" (see earth). Related: Unearthed; unearthing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Nearby words for unearthed

Word Value for unearthed

13
14
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