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2017 Word of the Year

endurable

[en-doo r-uh-buh l, -dyoo r-] /ɛnˈdʊər ə bəl, -ˈdyʊər-/
adjective
1.
capable of being endured; bearable; tolerable.
Origin of endurable
1600-1610
First recorded in 1600-10; endure + -able
Related forms
endurability, endurableness, noun
endurably, adverb
nonendurable, adjective
unendurability, adjective
unendurable, adjective
unendurableness, noun
unendurably, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for unendurable
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The thought that Rima had perished, that she was lost, was unendurable.

    Green Mansions W. H. Hudson
  • On his first trips, the loneliness had been terrible, unendurable.

    Salvage in Space John Stewart Williamson
  • But stark fear and the memory of unendurable pain drove him on.

    Happy Ending Fredric Brown
  • Life will be unendurable with an Irish Parliament returned by priests.

    Ireland as It Is Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)
  • "Oh, I'm—it's unendurable in there," spoke the voice of the hostess.

    The Market-Place Harold Frederic
  • To be kept in the dark, and by his own wife, was the one thing that was unendurable.

    Kept in the Dark

    Anthony Trollope
  • Forgiveness must be preceded by knowledge, and the thought of that was unendurable.

    Despair's Last Journey David Christie Murray
  • The situation became so unendurable that the thought of suicide began to occur to her.

    Psychotherapy Hugo Mnsterberg
  • After waiting seven years, a delay of ten minutes was unendurable.

    Lost Edward Bellamy
British Dictionary definitions for unendurable

unendurable

/ˌʌnɪnˈdjʊrəbəl/
adjective
1.
not able to be undergone or tolerated; insufferable
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for unendurable
adj.

1620s, from un- (1) "not" + endurable. Related: Unendurably.

endurable

adj.

c.1600, "able to endure," from endure + -able. Meaning "able to be endured" is from c.1800. Related: Endurably.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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