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[vey-keyt or, esp. British, vuh-keyt, vey-] /ˈveɪ keɪt or, esp. British, vəˈkeɪt, veɪ-/
verb (used with object), vacated, vacating.
to give up possession or occupancy of:
to vacate an apartment.
to give up or relinquish (an office, position, etc.):
to vacate the presidency of a firm.
to render inoperative; deprive of validity; void; annul:
to vacate a legal judgment.
to cause to be empty or unoccupied; make vacant:
to vacate one's mind of worries.
verb (used without object), vacated, vacating.
to withdraw from occupancy; surrender possession:
We will have to vacate when our lease expires.
to give up or leave a position, office, etc.
to leave; go away.
Origin of vacate
1635-45; < Latin vacātus past participle of vacāre to be empty; see -ate1
Related forms
vacatable, adjective
prevacate, verb (used with object), prevacated, prevacating.
revacate, verb (used with object), revacated, revacating.
unvacated, adjective Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for vacated
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I am constantly wishing that you would step forward into the place he has vacated.

    The Religio-Medical Masquerade Frederick William Peabody
  • He told them he was in love, and that he could not marry unless they vacated the house.

    Humorous Ghost Stories Dorothy Scarborough
  • "Never mind, girl," he rejoined as he deliberately crossed the hall and sat down in the chair which she had just vacated.

  • Joe, scowling and avoiding Bela's eye, dropped into the seat the other man had vacated.

    The Huntress Hulbert Footner
  • Monsieur had the kindness to give me the room which he vacated.

British Dictionary definitions for vacated


verb (mainly transitive)
to cause (something) to be empty, esp by departing from or abandoning it: to vacate a room
(also intransitive) to give up the tenure, possession, or occupancy of (a place, post, etc); leave or quit
  1. to cancel or rescind
  2. to make void or of no effect; annul
Derived Forms
vacatable, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for vacated



1640s, "to make void, to annul," from Latin vacatum, past participle of vacare "to be empty" (see vain). Meaning "to leave, give up, quit" (a place) is attested from 1791. Related: Vacated; vacating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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