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vail1

[veyl] /veɪl/
verb (used with object)
1.
to let sink; lower.
2.
Archaic. to take off or doff (one's hat), as in respect or submission.
Origin of vail1
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English valen, aphetic variant of avalen (now obsolete) < Middle French avaler to move down, verbal derivative of phrase a val down (literally, to the valley) (a to (< Latin ad) + val vale)

vail2

[veyl] /veɪl/ Archaic.
verb (used with or without object)
1.
to be of use or profit; avail.
noun
2.
a tip; gratuity.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English; aphetic variant of avail

vail3

[veyl] /veɪl/ Obsolete
noun
1.
a veil.
verb (used with object)
2.
to veil.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for vailed
Historical Examples
  • As he entered Lyon's room, Witzig saw a lady seated near the door, vailed and evidently waiting for some one.

  • And still the vailed figure at the window sat rigidly there, uttering no cry, shedding no tears.

    A Changed Heart May Agnes Fleming
  • An hour afterward, Mr. Blake left his office by the back-door, accompanied by the vailed lady.

    A Changed Heart May Agnes Fleming
  • A lamp, vailed under a semi-opaque shade, served only to render more visible the shadows of this strange chamber.

  • And kind and loving were Harold's looks and brief words, as he rode with vailed bonnet through the swarming streets.

    Harold, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • She had long black eyelashes, which vailed beautiful brown eyes.

    A History of Pendennis, Volume 1 William Makepeace Thackeray
  • Her face is vailed, and still she sufficiently betrays herself to make more than one of those who pass her look round sharply.

  • The women are vailed, and secluded, as in all oriental countries, but they have still much freedom.

    Torrey's Narrative William Torrey
  • He vailed his bonnet to no one but a judge,—and not always that with much ceremonious observance.

    Lady Anna

    Anthony Trollope
  • But the dark fate that hung over her at that hour was vailed from his view, and hope mingled with fear in his bosom.

    Eveline Mandeville

    Alvin Addison
British Dictionary definitions for vailed

vail1

/veɪl/
verb (transitive) (obsolete)
1.
to lower (something, such as a weapon), esp as a sign of deference or submission
2.
to remove (the hat, cap, etc) as a mark of respect or meekness
Word Origin
c14 valen, from obsolete avalen, from Old French avaler to let fall, from Latin ad vallem, literally: to the valley, that is, down, from ad to + vallisvalley

vail2

/veɪl/
noun, verb
1.
an archaic word for avail

vail3

/veɪl/
noun, verb
1.
an archaic spelling of veil
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for vailed

vail

n.

"advantage, profit," early 15c., from vail (v.) "to be of use or service" (c.1300), from Old French vail, from valoir "to be of value or worth" (see value (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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