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vexed

[vekst] /vɛkst/
adjective
1.
irritated; annoyed:
vexed at the slow salesclerks.
2.
much discussed or disputed:
a vexed question.
3.
tossed about, as waves.
Origin of vexed
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English; see vex, -ed2
Related forms
vexedly
[vek-sid-lee] /ˈvɛk sɪd li/ (Show IPA),
adverb
vexedness, noun
half-vexed, adjective
unvexed, adjective

vex

[veks] /vɛks/
verb (used with object)
1.
to irritate; annoy; provoke:
His noisy neighbors often vexed him.
2.
to torment; trouble; distress; plague; worry:
Lack of money vexes many.
3.
to discuss or debate (a subject, question, etc.) with vigor or at great length:
to vex a question endlessly without agreeing.
4.
to disturb by motion; stir up; toss about.
5.
to afflict with physical pain.
Origin
1375-1425; late Middle English vexen < Old French vexer < Latin vexāre to shake, jolt, harass, annoy, frequentative of vehere to carry, convey
Related forms
vexer, noun
vexingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. anger, irk, fret, nettle. 2. hector, harry, harass.
Antonyms
1. delight.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for vexed
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • This vexed her so mach that she wept day and night about it.

    The Memoirs of the Louis XIV. and The Regency, Complete Elizabeth-Charlotte, Duchesse d'Orleans
  • I think it was the want of her, more than the value of the craft, that troubled and vexed him.

    Up the River Oliver Optic
  • Victor was vexed by the stranger's intrusion, but could not gainsay Mrs. Joyce.

  • I was vexed at this mishap, for I did not like to drink my coffee without milk.

    Down The River Oliver Optic
  • Husbands were vexed with fear, and wives with insult to their persons: and to these wrongs folk bowed.

    The Danish History, Books I-IX Saxo Grammaticus ("Saxo the Learned")
  • If Mrs. Pig hadn't been so upset she might have been vexed—and with good reason.

    The Tale of Grunty Pig Arthur Scott Bailey
  • She is vexed by a growing conviction that Mabel's babies are sadly spoiled.

  • But just then I was in a reaction and vexed, and I voiced my vexation swiftly.

    The God of Love Justin Huntly McCarthy
  • vexed and mortified by a result so unexpected, De Valette hesitated what course to pursue.

    The Rivals of Acadia Harriet Vaughan Cheney
British Dictionary definitions for vexed

vexed

/vɛkst/
adjective
1.
annoyed, confused, or agitated
2.
much debated and discussed (esp in the phrase a vexed question)
Derived Forms
vexedly (ˈvɛksɪdlɪ) adverb
vexedness, noun

vex

/vɛks/
verb (transitive)
1.
to anger or annoy
2.
to confuse; worry
3.
(archaic) to agitate
Derived Forms
vexer, noun
vexing, adjective
vexingly, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Old French vexer, from Latin vexāre to jolt (in carrying), from vehere to convey
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for vexed
adj.

mid-15c., past participle adjective from vex. Phrase vexed question attested from 1848.

vex

v.

early 15c., from Middle French vexer, from Latin vexare "to attack, harass, trouble," from vexus, collateral form of vectus, past participle of vehere "to draw, carry" (see vehicle). Related: Vexed; vexing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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