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warder1

[wawr-der] /ˈwɔr dər/
noun
1.
a person who guards something, as a doorkeeper or caretaker.
2.
a soldier or other person set to guard an entrance.
3.
Chiefly British. an official having charge of prisoners in a jail.
Origin of warder1
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English warder(e) (see ward, -er1); compare Anglo-French wardere < Middle English
Related forms
wardership, noun

warder2

[wawr-der] /ˈwɔr dər/
noun
1.
a truncheon or staff of office or authority, used in giving signals.
Origin
1400-50; late Middle English < ?
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for warder
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He had been 'under observation' of a warder unconsciously since being carried there.

    Nevermore Rolf Boldrewood
  • If the warder thinks them not suspicious persons, they can come into the hall.

    Earl Hubert's Daughter Emily Sarah Holt
  • warder explained that they meant to have done so, but they had missed their way.

    The Red Man's Revenge R.M. Ballantyne
  • She had succeeded in communicating with him through the medium of this warder.

    Fantmas Pierre Souvestre
  • Heimdall also is a light and gracious god; he is the warder of the sir, and stays near the bridge Bifrst.

    History of Religion Allan Menzies
  • He smiled as the warder made an exclamation of nervous warning.

    Fantmas Pierre Souvestre
  • At every cottage door there was a whispering group staring up at the warder's Tower.

    The White Blackbird Hudson Douglas
  • Gurn raised his head and looked at the warder with a cryptic gaze.

    Fantmas Pierre Souvestre
  • A soldier always accompanies the warder who distributes the food, to see that no word is spoken.

British Dictionary definitions for warder

warder1

/ˈwɔːdə/
noun
1.
(mainly Brit) an officer in charge of prisoners in a jail
2.
a person who guards or has charge of something
Derived Forms
wardership, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-French wardere, from Old French warder to guard, of Germanic origin

warder2

/ˈwɔːdə/
noun
1.
(formerly) a staff or truncheon carried by a ruler as an emblem of authority and used to signal his wishes or intentions
Word Origin
C15: perhaps from Middle English warden to ward
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for warder
n.

c.1400, "guardian of an entrance," from Anglo-French wardere "guardian," agent noun from Old North French warder "to guard" (Old French garder), of Germanic origin (see guard (n.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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