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weal1

[weel] /wil/
noun
1.
well-being, prosperity, or happiness:
the public weal; weal and woe.
2.
Obsolete. wealth or riches.
3.
Obsolete. the body politic; the state.
Origin of weal1
900
before 900; Middle English wele, Old English wela; akin to well1

weal2

[weel] /wil/
noun
1.
Origin
variant of wale1, with ea of wheal
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for weals
Historical Examples
  • A small weir over a river, where weals are laid for taking fish.

    The Sailor's Word-Book William Henry Smyth
  • If weals had started up across it, Noel would not have been surprised.

    Saint's Progress John Galsworthy
  • He got up and beat her till she was marked with weals, but she uttered no complaint.

    The Brown Fairy Book Andrew Lang
  • I saw all the swords of Feudal and all the weals of Industrial war.

    Tremendous Trifles G. K. Chesterton
  • All seems far from the world, drowsy, careless, indifferent to the weals and woes of suffering humanity.

    Mrs. Geoffrey Duchess
  • But the sight of the weals on Clem's back had for the moment killed all feeling in her but disgust and horror.

    Shining Ferry

    Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
  • He pulled down the boy's shirt, and saw that his back was covered with weals, the effect of the cruel flogging he had received.

    The Paladins of Edwin the Great Clements R. Markham
  • His face was ashen, the veins in his forehead standing out like weals, and his eyes gleamed like blue flame—mad eyes.

    The Lamp of Fate Margaret Pedler
  • I turned, every bone in my body ached: the weals of the stirrup-leathers smarted and burned.

    In Kings' Byways Stanley J. Weyman
  • If I was to bare my arm now I could show you weals that's more colours and brighter than your neckankercher there.

British Dictionary definitions for weals

weal1

/wiːl/
noun
1.
a raised mark on the surface of the body produced by a blow Also called wale, welt, wheal
Word Origin
C19: variant of wale1, influenced in form by wheal

weal2

/wiːl/
noun
1.
(archaic) prosperity or wellbeing (now esp in the phrases the public weal, the common weal)
2.
(obsolete) the state
3.
(obsolete) wealth
Word Origin
Old English wela; related to Old Saxon welo, Old High German wolo
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for weals

weal

n.1

"well-being," Old English wela "wealth," in late Old English also "welfare, well-being," from West Germanic *welon, from PIE root *wel- "to wish, will" (see will (v.)). Related to well (adv.).

weal

n.2

"raised mark on skin," 1821, alteration of wale (q.v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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weals in Medicine

weal (wēl)
n.
A ridge on the flesh raised by a blow; a welt.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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8
9
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