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anchor

[ang-ker] /ˈæŋ kər/
noun
1.
any of various devices dropped by a chain, cable, or rope to the bottom of a body of water for preventing or restricting the motion of a vessel or other floating object, typically having broad, hooklike arms that bury themselves in the bottom to provide a firm hold.
2.
any similar device for holding fast or checking motion:
an anchor of stones.
3.
any device for securing a suspension or cantilever bridge at either end.
4.
any of various devices, as a metal tie, for binding one part of a structure to another.
5.
a person or thing that can be relied on for support, stability, or security; mainstay:
Hope was his only anchor.
6.
Radio and Television. a person who is the main broadcaster on a program of news, sports, etc., and who usually also serves as coordinator of all participating broadcasters during the program; anchorman or anchorwoman; anchorperson.
7.
Television. a program that attracts many viewers who are likely to stay tuned to the network for the programs that follow.
8.
a well-known store, especially a department store, that attracts customers to the shopping center in which it is located.
Also called anchor store.
9.
Slang. automotive brakes.
10.
Military. a key position in defense lines.
11.
Also, anchorman. Sports.
  1. the person on a team, especially a relay team, who competes last.
  2. the person farthest to the rear on a tug-of-war team.
verb (used with object)
12.
to hold fast by an anchor.
13.
to fix or fasten; affix firmly:
The button was anchored to the cloth with heavy thread.
14.
to act or serve as an anchor for:
He anchored the evening news.
verb (used without object)
15.
to drop anchor; lie or ride at anchor:
The ship anchored at dawn.
16.
to keep hold or be firmly fixed:
The insect anchored fast to its prey.
17.
Sports, Radio and Television. to act or serve as an anchor.
Idioms
18.
at anchor, held in place by an anchor:
The luxury liner is at anchor in the harbor.
19.
drag anchor, (of a vessel) to move with a current or wind because an anchor has failed to hold.
20.
drop anchor, to anchor a vessel:
They dropped anchor in a bay to escape the storm.
21.
weigh anchor, to raise the anchor:
We will weigh anchor at dawn.
Origin of anchor
900
before 900; Middle English anker, ancre, Old English ancor, ancer, ancra (compare Old Frisian, Middle Dutch, Middle Low German anker) < Latin anc(h)ora < Greek ánkȳra
Related forms
anchorable, adjective
anchorless, adjective
anchorlike, adjective
reanchor, verb
unanchored, adjective
well-anchored, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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British Dictionary definitions for well-anchored

anchor

/ˈæŋkə/
noun
1.
any of several devices, usually of steel, attached to a vessel by a cable and dropped overboard so as to grip the bottom and restrict the vessel's movement
2.
an object used to hold something else firmly in place: the rock provided an anchor for the rope
3.
a source of stability or security: religion was his anchor
4.
  1. a metal cramp, bolt, or similar fitting, esp one used to make a connection to masonry
  2. (as modifier): anchor bolt, anchor plate
5.
  1. the rear person in a tug-of-war team
  2. short for anchorman, anchorwoman
6.
at anchor, (of a vessel) anchored
7.
cast anchor, come to anchor, drop anchor, to anchor a vessel
8.
drag anchor, See drag (sense 13)
9.
ride at anchor, to be anchored
10.
weigh anchor, to raise a vessel's anchor or (of a vessel) to have its anchor raised in preparation for departure
verb
11.
to use an anchor to hold (a vessel) in one place
12.
to fasten or be fastened securely; fix or become fixed firmly
13.
(transitive) (radio, television) to act as an anchorman on
See also anchors
Word Origin
Old English ancor, from Latin ancora, from Greek ankura; related to Greek ankos bend; compare Latin uncus bent, hooked
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for well-anchored

anchor

n.

Old English ancor, borrowed 9c. from Latin ancora "anchor," from or cognate with Greek ankyra "anchor, hook" (see ankle). A very early borrowing and said to be the only Latin nautical term used in the Germanic languages. The -ch- form emerged late 16c., a pedantic imitation of a corrupt spelling of the Latin word. The figurative sense of "that which gives stability or security" is from late 14c. Meaning "host or presenter of a TV or radio program" is from 1965, short for anchorman.

anchor

v.

c.1200, from anchor (n.). Related: Anchored; anchoring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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