Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

The Best Internet Slang

wilful

[wil-fuh l] /ˈwɪl fəl/
adjective
1.
Related forms
wilfully, adverb
wilfulness, noun
unwilful, adjective
unwilfully, adverb
unwilfulness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for wilfully
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But it is provoking to find people so blind—so wilfully blind—to their own interest.

    Wilfrid Cumbermede George MacDonald
  • She was sure, however, that he knew of her visits and wilfully avoided her.

    A Singer from the Sea Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr
  • To prove this he wilfully exaggerated his gruffness and curtness of manner.

    His Masterpiece Emile Zola
  • Tibby rose to his feet, and wilfully caught his person on the backs of the chairs.

    Howards End E. M. Forster
  • His air of weary indifference was accentuated, I could not help thinking, wilfully.

    Under Western Eyes Joseph Conrad
  • This was the only known instance of her wilfully injuring game.

  • That she was wilfully dragging her sister's name into the conversation?

    A Houseful of Girls Sarah Tytler
  • We order her to 'heave to,' which order is wilfully or unwittingly misunderstood.

British Dictionary definitions for wilfully

wilful

/ˈwɪlfʊl/
adjective
1.
intent on having one's own way; headstrong or obstinate
2.
intentional: wilful murder
Derived Forms
wilfully, (US) willfully, adverb
wilfulness, (US) willfulness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for wilful

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for wilfully

17
20
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for wilfully