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Word of the Day

Monday, April 24, 2017
Definitions for synesthesia
  1. a sensation produced in one modality when a stimulus is applied to another modality, as when the hearing of a certain sound induces the visualization of a certain color.

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Citations for synesthesia
Edward's inherited synesthesia was consistent and stable throughout his lifetime. His took a standard form: seeing numbers as colors. Richard Powers, The Echo Maker, 2006
Baudelaire and Rimbaud wrote poems about synesthesia. Kandinsky wrote about it and perhaps used it in his art. By the middle of the twentieth century, synesthesia was still present, of course--Nabokov was describing his colored graphemes and putting them to dazzling use in his anagrammatic wordplay. Rachel Riederer, "Uncommon Sense," Tin House, Volume 13, Number 3, Spring 2012
Origin of synesthesia
1890-1895
Synesthesia is a New Latin construction dating back to the 1890s. It is based on the Greek word aísthēsis “sensation, perception.”
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