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-florous

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a combining form meaning “-flowered,” “having flowers,” used in the formation of adjectives: uniflorous.
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Origin of -florous

<Latin -flōrus.See flori-, -ous
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

WORDS THAT USE -FLOROUS

What does -florous mean?

The combining formflorous is used like a suffix meaning “-flowered” or “having flowers.” It is very occasionally used in scientific terms, especially in botany.

The form –florous comes from Latin –flōrus, meaning “flowered.” The Greek equivalent is ánthos, “flower,” which is the source of the combining form antho. Learn more at our Words That Use article for antho-.

What are variants of -florous?

While –florous doesn’t have any variants, it is related to the combining forms flor and flori, as in florigen. Discover more at our Words That Use articles for both forms.

Examples of -florous

One example of a scientific term that uses –florous is uniflorous, “having only one flower.”

The form uni means “single, one,” from Latin ūnus, while –florous means “having flowers.” Uniflorous literally translates to “having one flower.”

What are some words that use the combining form –florous?

What are some other forms that –florous may be commonly confused with?

Break it down!

The word gemini comes from the Latin for “twins.” With this in mind, what is a geminiflorous plant?

British Dictionary definitions for -florous

-florous

adj combining form
indicating number or type of flowerstubuliflorous
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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