aborigine

[ab-uh-rij-uh-nee]
See more synonyms for aborigine on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. one of the original or earliest known inhabitants of a country or region.
  2. (initial capital letter) Also Aboriginal. Also called Australian Aborigine. a member of the people who were the earliest inhabitants of Australia.
  3. aborigines, the original, native fauna or flora of a region.

Origin of aborigine

1540–50; by back formation from aborigines < Latin Aborīginēs the pre-Roman inhabitants of Italy, probably alteration of an earlier ethnonym by association with ab origine
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for aborigine

primitive, aboriginal, native, autochthon, bushman, indigene

Examples from the Web for aborigine

Historical Examples of aborigine


British Dictionary definitions for aborigine

aborigine

noun
  1. an original inhabitant of a country or region who has been there from the earliest known times

Word Origin for aborigine

C16: back formation from aborigines, from Latin: inhabitants of Latium in pre-Roman times, probably representing some tribal name but associated in folk etymology with ab origine from the beginning

Aborigine

noun
  1. Also called: Aboriginal a member of the indigenous people who were living in Australia when European settlers arrived
  2. any of the languages of this peopleSee also Australian (def. 3)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for aborigine
n.

1858, mistaken singular of aborigines (1540s; the correct singular is aboriginal), from Latin Aborigines "the first ancestors of the Romans; the first inhabitants" (especially of Latium), possibly a tribal name, or from ab origine, literally "from the beginning." Extended 1789 to natives of other countries which Europeans have colonized. Australian slang shortening Abo attested from 1922.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper