abstractive

[ab-strak-tiv]

Origin of abstractive

From the Medieval Latin word abstractīvus, dating back to 1480–90. See abstract, -ive
Related formsab·strac·tive·ly, adverbab·strac·tive·ness, nounun·ab·strac·tive, adjectiveun·ab·strac·tive·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for abstractive

Historical Examples of abstractive

  • A polarity is maintained throughout: the abstractive and the concretional.

    The Mystery of Space

    Robert T. Browne

  • There are classes of these abstractive elements which are of great importance.

    The Concept of Nature

    Alfred North Whitehead

  • Let σ be the name of any condition which some abstractive sets fulfil.

    The Concept of Nature

    Alfred North Whitehead

  • I will call such a set of durations an ‘abstractive set’ of durations.

    The Concept of Nature

    Alfred North Whitehead

  • Accordingly an event-particle could cover no other abstractive element.

    The Concept of Nature

    Alfred North Whitehead