alchemist

[al-kuh-mist]
See more synonyms for alchemist on Thesaurus.com

Origin of alchemist

1350–1400; Middle English alkamist; probably < Medieval Latin alchymista, equivalent to alchym(ia) alchemy + -ista -ist

Alchemist, The

noun
  1. a comedy (1610) by Ben Jonson.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for alchemist

Contemporary Examples of alchemist

Historical Examples of alchemist

  • The alchemist, hearing of the royal intention, again determined to fly.

    Self-Help

    Samuel Smiles

  • The alchemist acted on the hint, and began his experiments, working night and day.

    Self-Help

    Samuel Smiles

  • "You must take me there," said Paul, smiling good-humoredly at the reference to the alchemist.

    Paul Patoff

    F. Marion Crawford

  • He was not exactly an alchemist; he was an astrologer, and there are the ruins of his tower in the park.

    Paul Patoff

    F. Marion Crawford

  • She was more than a merely good cook; she was an alchemist in food stuffs.

    Gigolo

    Edna Ferber


British Dictionary definitions for alchemist

alchemist

noun
  1. a person who practises alchemy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for alchemist
n.

1510s, from Middle French alquemiste, from Medieval Latin alchimista (see alchemy). Earlier forms were alchemister (late 14c.), alkanamyer (late 15c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper