always

[ awl-weyz, -weez ]
/ ˈɔl weɪz, -wiz /

adverb

every time; on every occasion; without exception: He always works on Saturday.
all the time; continuously; uninterruptedly: There is always some pollution in the air.
forever: Will you always love me?
in any event; at any time; if necessary: She can always move back with her parents.

Nearby words

Origin of always

1200–50; Middle English alwayes, alleweyes, alles weis, genitive (denoting distribution; cf. once) of all wei; alle- lost its genitive ending and was treated as a compounding element under influence of alle wey alway. See all, way1 alway, -s1

Synonym study

2, 3. Both always and ever refer to uniform or perpetual continuance. Always often expresses or implies repetition as producing the uniformity or continuance: The sun always rises in the east. Ever implies an unchanging sameness throughout: Natural law is ever to be reckoned with.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for always

British Dictionary definitions for always

always

/ (ˈɔːlweɪz, -wɪz) /

adverb

without exception; on every occasion; every timehe always arrives on time
continually; repeatedly
in any caseyou could always take a day off work
informal for ever; without endour marriage is for always
Also (archaic): alway

Word Origin for always

C13 alles weiss, from Old English ealne weg, literally: all the way; see all, way
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012