American

[uh-mer-i-kuh n]
|

adjective

noun


Origin of American

First recorded in 1570–80; Americ(a) + -an
Related formsA·mer·i·can·ly, adverbA·mer·i·can·ness, noun

American, The

noun

a novel (1877) by Henry James.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for american

Contemporary Examples of american

Historical Examples of american

  • In every American home that is a home, to-day, it demands attention.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • A courage, moreover —the gambler's courage—that is typically American.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • She wa'n't meant fur it—and I'd rather have her marry an American, anyhow.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • They saw an American ship riding at anchor a mile or more from shore.

    Brave and Bold

    Horatio Alger

  • There was no one in sight, but it was evident that a party from an American ship had visited the island.

    Brave and Bold

    Horatio Alger


British Dictionary definitions for american

American

adjective

of or relating to the United States of America, its inhabitants, or their form of English
of or relating to the American continent

noun

a native or citizen of the US
a native or inhabitant of any country of North, Central, or South America
the English language as spoken or written in the United States
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for american

American

1570s (n.); 1590s (adj.), from Modern Latin Americanus, from America (q.v.); originally in reference to what now are called Native Americans; the sense of "resident of North America of European (originally British) descent" is first recorded 1640s (adj.); 1765 (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper