anachronism

[ uh-nak-ruh-niz-uh m ]
/ əˈnæk rəˌnɪz əm /

WATCH NOW: What Are Some Examples Of Anachronism?

WATCH NOW: What Are Some Examples Of Anachronism?

For as realistic as they try to be, movies are rife with anachronisms. Here are a few examples ...

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noun

something or someone that is not in its correct historical or chronological time, especially a thing or person that belongs to an earlier time: The sword is an anachronism in modern warfare.
an error in chronology in which a person, object, event, etc., is assigned a date or period other than the correct one: To assign Michelangelo to the 14th century is an anachronism.

Origin of anachronism

1640–50; < Latin anachronismus < Greek anachronismós a wrong time reference, equivalent to anachron(ízein) to make a wrong time reference (see ana-, chron-, -ize) + -ismos -ism
Related formsan·a·chron·i·cal·ly [an-uh-kron-ik-lee] /ˌæn əˈkrɒn ɪk li/, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for anachronism

British Dictionary definitions for anachronism

anachronism

/ (əˈnækrəˌnɪzəm) /

noun

the representation of an event, person, or thing in a historical context in which it could not have occurred or existed
a person or thing that belongs or seems to belong to another timeshe regards the Church as an anachronism
Derived Formsanachronistic, adjectiveanachronistically, adverb

Word Origin for anachronism

C17: from Latin anachronismus, from Greek anakhronismos a mistake in chronology, from anakhronizein to err in a time reference, from ana- + khronos time
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for anachronism

anachronism


n.

1640s, "an error in computing time or finding dates," from Latin anachronismus, from Greek anakhronismos, from anakhronizein "refer to wrong time," from ana- "against" (see ana-) + khronos "time" (see chrono-). Meaning "something out of harmony with the present" first recorded 1816.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper