conventional

[ kuh n-ven-shuh-nl ]
/ kənˈvɛn ʃə nl /
||

adjective

Origin of conventional

From the Late Latin word conventiōnālis, dating back to 1575–85. See convention, -al1
SYNONYMS FOR conventional
1 See formal1.
2 usual, habitual, customary.
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for anti-conventional

  • Verestchagin, Russian painter, is realistic to an extreme degree and anti-conventional; b. 1842.

    The Nuttall Encyclopaedia|Edited by Rev. James Wood

British Dictionary definitions for anti-conventional

conventional

/ (kənˈvɛnʃənəl) /

adjective

noun

bridge another word for convention (def. 7)
Derived Formsconventionally, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for anti-conventional

conventional


adj.

late 15c., "of the nature of an agreement," from Late Latin conventionalis "pertaining to convention or agreement," from Latin conventionem (see convention). Meaning "of the nature of a convention" is from 1812, now rare; "established by social convention" is from 1761; that of "following tradition" is from 1831; that of "non-nuclear" is from 1955. Realted: Conventionality; conventionally.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper