kickback

[kik-bak]
noun
  1. a percentage of income given to a person in a position of power or influence as payment for having made the income possible: usually considered improper or unethical.
  2. a rebate, usually given secretively by a seller to a buyer or to one who influenced the buyer.
  3. the practice of an employer or a person in a supervisory position of taking back a portion of the wages due workers.
  4. a response, usually vigorous.
  5. a sudden, uncontrolled movement of a machine, tool, or other device, as on starting or in striking an obstruction: A kickback from a chain saw can be dangerous.

Origin of kickback

1930–35, Americanism; noun use of verb phrase kick back
Related formsan·ti·kick·back, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

British Dictionary definitions for anti-kickback

kickback

noun
  1. a strong reaction
  2. part of an income paid to a person having influence over the size or payment of the income, esp by some illegal arrangement
verb kick back (adverb)
  1. (intr) to have a strong reaction
  2. (intr) (esp of a gun) to recoil
  3. to pay a kickback to (someone)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for anti-kickback

kickback

n.

also kick-back, c.1900 in various mechanical senses, from kick (v.) + back (adv.). By 1926 in a slang sense of "be forced to return pelf, pay back to victims," which was extended to illegal partial give-backs of government-set wages that were extorted from workers by employers. Hence sense of "illegal or improper payment" (1932).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper