antiquate

[an-ti-kweyt]
verb (used with object), an·ti·quat·ed, an·ti·quat·ing.
  1. to make obsolete, old-fashioned, or out of date by replacing with something newer or better: This latest device will antiquate the ice-cube tray.
  2. to design or create in an antique style; cause to appear antique.

Origin of antiquate

1400–50; late Middle English antiquat old < Medieval Latin antīquātus old, ancient, past participle of antiquāre to put in an earlier state, verbal derivative of Latin antīquus; see antique
Related formsan·ti·qua·tion, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

British Dictionary definitions for antiquation

antiquate

verb (tr)
  1. to make obsolete or old-fashioned
  2. to give an old or antique appearance to

Word Origin for antiquate

C15: from Latin antīquāre to make old, from antīquus ancient
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for antiquation
n.

1640s, from Late Latin antiquationem (nominative antiquatio), noun of action from past participle stem of antiquare (see antique (adj.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper