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apprentice

[ uh-pren-tis ]
/ əˈprɛn tɪs /
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See synonyms for: apprentice / apprenticed / apprenticing / apprenticeship on Thesaurus.com

noun
verb (used with object), ap·pren·ticed, ap·pren·tic·ing.
to bind to or place with an employer, master craftsman, or the like, for instruction in a trade.
verb (used without object), ap·pren·ticed, ap·pren·tic·ing.
to serve as an apprentice: He apprenticed for 14 years under a master silversmith.
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Origin of apprentice

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English ap(p)rentis, from Anglo-French, Old French ap(p)rentiz, from unattested Vulgar Latin apprenditīcius, equivalent to unattested apprendit(us) (for Latin apprehēnsus; see apprehensible) + Latin -īcius suffix forming adjectives from past participles, here nominalized

OTHER WORDS FROM apprentice

ap·pren·tice·ship, nounun·ap·pren·ticed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use apprentice in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for apprentice

apprentice
/ (əˈprɛntɪs) /

noun
someone who works for a skilled or qualified person in order to learn a trade or profession, esp for a recognized period
any beginner or novice
verb
(tr) to take, place, or bind as an apprentice

Derived forms of apprentice

apprenticeship, noun

Word Origin for apprentice

C14: from Old French aprentis, from Old French aprendre to learn, from Latin apprehendere to apprehend
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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