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apropos of

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Concerning, in connection with, as in Apropos of keeping in touch, I haven't heard from her in months. This idiom was a borrowing of the French à propos de (“to the purpose of”) in the 17th century. At first it was used without of and meant “fitting” or “opportune,” as in Their prompt arrival was very appropos. By the 1700s it was also being used with of, as in the current idiom, for “concerning” or “by way of.”

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The rainy weather could not ________ my elated spirits on my graduation day.
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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