autogenous

[aw-toj-uh-nuh s]

adjective

self-produced; self-generated.
Physiology. pertaining to substances generated in the body.
Metallurgy. self-fused, without the addition of solder or the application of an adhesive: an autogenous weld between two pieces of the same metal.

Nearby words

  1. autofocus,
  2. autogamy,
  3. autogenesis,
  4. autogenetic,
  5. autogenic training,
  6. autogenous vaccine,
  7. autogiro,
  8. autograft,
  9. autograph,
  10. autographic

Origin of autogenous

1840–50; < Greek autogen(ḗs) self-produced (see auto-1, -gen) + -ous

Related formsau·tog·e·nous·ly, adverb

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for autogenous


British Dictionary definitions for autogenous

autogenous

adjective

  1. originating within the bodyCompare heterogenous
  2. denoting a vaccine made from bacteria obtained from the patient's own body
self-generated; self-produced
denoting a weld in which the filler metal and the parent metal are of similar composition
Derived Formsautogenously, adverb

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for autogenous

autogenous

adj.

"self-generated," 1846, earlier autogeneal (1650s), from Greek autogenes "self-produced," from autos "self" (see auto-) + genes "formation, creation" (see genus). Modern form and biological use of the word said to have been coined by English paleontologist Richard Owen (1804-1892).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for autogenous

autogenous

[ô-tŏjə-nəs]

adj.

Of or relating to autogenesis; self-generating.
Of or relating to vaccines prepared from bacteria obtained from the infected person.
Related formsau•toge•nous•ly adv.


The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.