Dictionary.com

bailout

or bail-out

[ beyl-out ]
/ ˈbeɪlˌaʊt /
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noun
the act of parachuting from an aircraft, especially to escape a crash, fire, etc.
an instance of coming to the rescue, especially financially: a government bailout of a large company.
an alternative, additional choice, or the like: If the highway is jammed, you have two side roads as bailouts.
adjective
of, relating to, or consisting of means for relieving an emergency situation: bailout measures for hard-pressed smallbusinesses.
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Origin of bailout

First recorded in 1950–55; noun and adjective use of the verb phrase bail out
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use bailout in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for bailout (1 of 2)

bailout
/ (ˈbeɪlaʊt) /

noun
an act of bailing out, usually by the government, of a failing institution or business

British Dictionary definitions for bailout (2 of 2)

bail out

bale out


verb (adverb)
(intr) to make an emergency parachute jump from an aircraft
(tr) informal to help (a person, organization, etc) out of a predicamentthe government bailed the company out
(intr) informal to escape from a predicament
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with bailout

bail out

1

Empty water out of a boat, usually by dipping with a bucket or other container. For example, We had to keep bailing out water from this leaky canoe. [Early 1600s]

2

Rescue someone in an emergency, especially a financial crisis of some kind, as in They were counting on an inheritance to bail them out. [Colloquial; 1900s]

3

Jump out of an airplane, using a parachute. For example, When the second engine sputtered, the pilot decided to bail out. [c. 1930]

4

Give up on something, abandon a responsibility, as in The company was not doing well, so John decided to bail out while he could still find another job. [Second half of 1900s]

5

See make bail.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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