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beck

1
[ bek ]
/ bɛk /
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noun
a gesture used to signal, summon, or direct someone.
Chiefly Scot. a bow or curtsy of greeting.
verb (used with or without object)
Archaic. beckon.
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Idioms about beck

    at someone's beck and call, ready to do someone's bidding; subject to someone's slightest wish: He has three servants at his beck and call.

Origin of beck

1
First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English verb bekken, bec, variant of beckenen, bek(e)nen beckon; noun derivative of the verb

Other definitions for beck (2 of 4)

beck2
[ bek ]
/ bɛk /

noun North England.
a brook, especially a swiftly running stream with steep banks.

Origin of beck

2
First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English bek, bec(k), from Scandinavian; compare Old Norse bekkr; akin to Old English bæc, bec, bece, Dutch beek, German Bach “brook”

Other definitions for beck (3 of 4)

beck3
[ bek ]
/ bɛk /

verb (used with object) Metalworking.
to form (a billet or the like) into a tire or hoop by rolling or hammering on a mandrel or anvil.

Origin of beck

3
First recorded in 1830–35 as beck-iron; verb use of the noun beck, shortening of beck-iron, a variant of bick-iron

Other definitions for beck (4 of 4)

Beck
[ bek ]
/ bɛk /

noun
Dave, 1894–1993, U.S. labor leader: president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters 1952–57.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use beck in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for beck (1 of 2)

beck1
/ (bɛk) /

noun
a nod, wave, or other gesture or signal
at someone's beck and call ready to obey someone's orders instantly; subject to someone's slightest whim

Word Origin for beck

C14: short for becnen to beckon

British Dictionary definitions for beck (2 of 2)

beck2
/ (bɛk) /

noun
(in N England) a stream, esp a swiftly flowing one

Word Origin for beck

Old English becc, from Old Norse bekkr; related to Old English bece, Old Saxon beki, Old High German bah brook, Sanskrit bhanga wave
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with beck

beck

see at someone's beck and call.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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