bitting

[ bit-ing ]
/ ˈbɪt ɪŋ /

noun

one of the indentations on the bit of a key.

Origin of bitting

Definition for bitting (2 of 4)

bit

1
[ bit ]
/ bɪt /

noun

verb (used with object), bit·ted, bit·ting.

Origin of bit

1
before 900; Middle English bite, Old English: action of biting; cognate with German Biss, Old Norse bit. See bite

Related forms

bit·less, adjective

Definition for bitting (3 of 4)

bitt

[ bit ]
/ bɪt /
Nautical

noun

Also called bollard. a strong post of wood or iron projecting, usually in pairs, above the deck of a ship, used for securing cables, lines for towing, etc.

verb (used with object)

to wrap (a cable) around a bitt to secure it.

Origin of bitt

Middle English, perhaps < Dutch or Low German; compare Dutch, Low German beting, in same sense, akin to Middle High German bizze wooden peg, Old Norse biti crossbeam

Definition for bitting (4 of 4)

bit

4
[ bit ]
/ bɪt /

verb

simple past tense and a past participle of bite.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for bitting

British Dictionary definitions for bitting (1 of 5)

bitt

/ (bɪt) nautical /

noun

one of a pair of strong posts on the deck of a ship for securing mooring and other lines
another word for bollard (def. 1)

verb

(tr) to secure (a line) by means of a bitt

Word Origin for bitt

C14: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse biti cross beam, Middle High German bizze wooden peg

British Dictionary definitions for bitting (2 of 5)

bit

1
/ (bɪt) /

noun

Word Origin for bit

Old English bite action of biting; see bite

British Dictionary definitions for bitting (3 of 5)

bit

2
/ (bɪt) /

noun

verb bits, bitting or bitted (tr)

to put a bit in the mouth of (a horse)
to restrain; curb

Word Origin for bit

Old English bita; related to Old English bītan to bite

British Dictionary definitions for bitting (4 of 5)

bit

3
/ (bɪt) /

verb

the past tense and (archaic) past participle of bite

British Dictionary definitions for bitting (5 of 5)

bit

4
/ (bɪt) /

noun maths computing

a single digit of binary notation, represented either by 0 or by 1
the smallest unit of information, indicating the presence or absence of a single feature
a unit of capacity of a computer, consisting of an element of its physical structure capable of being in either of two states, such as a switch with on and off positions, or a microscopic magnet capable of alignment in two directions

Word Origin for bit

C20: from abbreviation of binary digit
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Science definitions for bitting

bit

[ bĭt ]

The smallest unit of computer memory. A bit holds one of two possible values, either of the binary digits 0 or 1. The term comes from the phrase binary digit. See Note at byte.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Culture definitions for bitting

bit


The smallest unit of information. One bit corresponds to a “yes” or “no.” Some examples of a bit of information: whether a light is on or off, whether a switch (like a transistor) is on or off, whether a grain of magnetized iron points up or down.

Note

The information in a digital computer is stored in the form of bits.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with bitting

bit


In addition to the idiom beginning with bit

  • bit by bit
  • bite off more than one can chew
  • bite one's nails
  • bite one's tongue
  • bite someone's head off
  • bite the bullet
  • bite the dust
  • bite the hand that feeds you

also see:

  • a bit
  • champ at the bit
  • do one's bit
  • every bit
  • not a bit
  • quite a bit
  • take the bit in one's mouth
  • two bits
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.