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book club

noun

  1. a company or other organization that sells books to its subscribers, often at a discount and usually through the mail.
  2. a club organized for the discussion and reviewing of books.


book club

noun

  1. a club that sells books at low prices to members, usually by mail order, esp on condition that they buy a minimum number


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Word History and Origins

Origin of book club1

First recorded in 1785–95
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Example Sentences

According to his bio, he’s somewhere at the “bottom of the social hierarchy” but he has an underrated intellect and would make a great guest for a game of Scrabble or a book club meeting.

One standing appointment Collins has kept during the pandemic is with his book club, made up mostly of members of the Christiantelligentsia.

From Time

It’s guest hosted by Maria Konnikova, the New Yorker writer and author of The Biggest Bluff, which was the very first selection of our book club, last summer.

When Abraham’s son Kai, 10, had a hard time adjusting to online learning and yearned to spend more time with friends, she signed him up for an outdoor book club with other fourth- and fifth-grade boys who enjoy reading.

The social aspect comes from digital book clubs, which paying users can start and non-paying customers can join.

From Fortune

To  my own surprise, last year I started a book club, which includes writers, editors and an agent.

My wife read The Leftovers with her book club but the one fight that broke out in book club was about the cigarette smoking.

This weekend I posted a book club entry about Adam Winkler's important history of US gun law, Gunfight.

Blogging the Revolution, the book by the authors of the Caracas Chronicles blog, was reviewed in David's Book Club yesterday.

At the Independent blog, John Rentoul replies to my book club entry on Catch-22.

A book club chose The Revenger, the critics sang its praises, and Bird bought himself a house in the country.

The Sin Book Club continued to be a profound secret, and was considered of great value.

The intentions of the book club are well known, to catch the productions of the press as they rise.

She came to the last person she had met—the old lady who had come to the book-club meeting with a cane—Mrs. Moyer.

Such a book-club, as the “Grolier,” of New York, is a fortunate avenue of escape from these evils.

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