Boolean

[boo-lee-uh n]
adjective
  1. pertaining to or being a deductive logical system, as Boolean algebra, used to represent symbolically the relationships between sets, classes, and other entities.
  2. Computers. of or relating to a data type having two possible values representing “true” or “false.”
noun
  1. Computers. a Boolean data type.

Origin of Boolean

named after George Boole; see -an
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for boolean

Historical Examples of boolean

  • I thought you were kidding me, like that Boolean Algebra stuff.

    The Romantic Analogue

    W.W. Skupeldyckle

  • No stronger proof of this can be given than the Boolean logic embedded in computer hardware and programming languages.


Word Origin and History for boolean

Boolean

adj.

in reference to abstract algebraic systems, 1851, named for George Boole (1815-1864), English mathematician. The surname is a variant of Bull.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper