bring

[ bring ]
/ brɪŋ /

verb (used with object), brought, bring·ing.

Verb Phrases

Origin of bring

before 950; Middle English bringen, Old English bringan; cognate with Dutch brengen, German bringen, Gothic briggan

Related forms

bring·er, nounout·bring, verb (used with object), out·brought, out·bring·ing.

Can be confused

bring fetch1 take (see synonym study at the current entry)

Synonym study

1. Bring, fetch, take imply conveying or conducting in relation to the place where the speaker is. To bring is simply to convey or conduct: Bring it to me. I'm permitted to bring my dog here with me. It is the opposite of take, which means to convey or conduct away from the place where the speaker is: Bring it back here. Take it back there. Fetch means to go, get, and bring back: Fetch me that bottle.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for bring on (1 of 2)

bring on

verb (tr, adverb)

to induce or causethese pills will bring on labour
slang to cause sexual excitement in; stimulate

usage

The second sense of this word was formerly considered to be taboo, and it was labelled as such in previous editions of Collins English Dictionary . However, it has now become acceptable in speech, although some older or more conservative people may object to its use

British Dictionary definitions for bring on (2 of 2)

bring

/ (brɪŋ) /

verb brings, bringing or brought (tr)


Derived Forms

bringer, noun

Word Origin for bring

Old English bringan; related to Gothic briggan, Old High German bringan
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with bring on

bring on

1

Cause to happen, produce, as in His cold brought on an asthma attack. This usage was first recorded in John Milton's Samson Agonistes (1671): “These evils . . . I myself have brought them on.” Also see bring about.


2

Cause to appear or bring into action, as in Bring on the jugglers. [Mid-1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.