bring on


verb (tr, adverb)

to induce or causethese pills will bring on labour
slang to cause sexual excitement in; stimulate

usage for bring on

The second sense of this word was formerly considered to be taboo, and it was labelled as such in previous editions of Collins English Dictionary . However, it has now become acceptable in speech, although some older or more conservative people may object to its use
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with bring on

bring on

1

Cause to happen, produce, as in His cold brought on an asthma attack. This usage was first recorded in John Milton's Samson Agonistes (1671): “These evils . . . I myself have brought them on.” Also see bring about.

2

Cause to appear or bring into action, as in Bring on the jugglers. [Mid-1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.