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Brownian motion

[ brounē-ən ]
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The random movement of microscopic particles suspended in a liquid or gas, caused by collisions between these particles and the molecules of the liquid or gas. This movement is named for its identifier, Scottish botanist Robert Brown (1773-1858). See also kinetic theory.
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The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

How to use Brownian motion in a sentence

Cultural definitions for Brownian motion

Brownian motion

The erratic motion, visible through a microscope, of small grains suspended in a fluid. The motion results from collisions between the grains and atoms or molecules in the fluid.

notes for Brownian motion

Brownian motion was first explained by the twentieth-century physicist Albert Einstein, who considered it direct proof of the existence of atoms.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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