bus

1
[ buhs ]
/ bʌs /
||

noun, plural bus·es, bus·ses.

verb (used with object), bused or bussed, bus·ing or bus·sing.

to convey or transport by bus: to bus the tourists to another hotel.
to transport (pupils) to school by bus, especially as a means of achieving socioeconomic or racial diversity among students in a public school.

verb (used without object), bused or bussed, bus·ing or bus·sing.

to travel on or by means of a bus: We bused to New York on a theater trip.

Nearby words

  1. buryat,
  2. buryat autonomous republic,
  3. buryat republic,
  4. burying beetle,
  5. burying ground,
  6. bus boy,
  7. bus lane,
  8. bus line,
  9. bus shelter,
  10. bus stop

Idioms

    throw under the bus. throw(def 57).

Origin of bus

1
1825–35; short for omnibus; (def 6) short for omnibus bar

Can be confusedbussed bust

bus

2
[ buhs ]
/ bʌs /

verb (used with or without object), bused or bussed, bus·ing or bus·sing.

to work or act as a busboy or busgirl: She bused for her meals during her student days.

Origin of bus

2
First recorded in 1830–40; back formation from busboy

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for buses


British Dictionary definitions for buses

bus

/ (bʌs) /

noun plural buses or busses

verb buses, busing, bused, busses, bussing or bussed

to travel or transport by bus
mainly US and Canadian to transport (children) by bus from one area to a school in another in order to create racially integrated classes

Word Origin for bus

C19: short for omnibus

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for buses
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper