busing

or bus·sing

[ buhs-ing ]
/ ˈbʌs ɪŋ /

noun

the transporting of students by bus to schools outside their neighborhoods, especially as a means of achieving socioeconomic or racial diversity among students in a public school.

Origin of busing

1885–90; bus1 (v.) + -ing1, spelled irregular with single s, perhaps to avoid association with buss

Definition for busing (2 of 3)

bus

1
[ buhs ]
/ bʌs /

noun, plural bus·es, bus·ses.

verb (used with object), bused or bussed, bus·ing or bus·sing.

to convey or transport by bus: to bus the tourists to another hotel.
to transport (pupils) to school by bus, especially as a means of achieving socioeconomic or racial diversity among students in a public school.

verb (used without object), bused or bussed, bus·ing or bus·sing.

to travel on or by means of a bus: We bused to New York on a theater trip.

Origin of bus

1
1825–35; short for omnibus; (def 6) short for omnibus bar

Can be confused

bussed bust

Definition for busing (3 of 3)

bus

2
[ buhs ]
/ bʌs /

verb (used with or without object), bused or bussed, bus·ing or bus·sing.

to work or act as a busboy or busgirl: She bused for her meals during her student days.

Origin of bus

2
First recorded in 1830–40; back formation from busboy
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for busing

British Dictionary definitions for busing

bus

/ (bʌs) /

noun plural buses or busses

verb buses, busing, bused, busses, bussing or bussed

to travel or transport by bus
mainly US and Canadian to transport (children) by bus from one area to a school in another in order to create racially integrated classes

Word Origin for bus

C19: short for omnibus
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Culture definitions for busing

busing


The movement of students from one neighborhood to a school in another neighborhood, usually by bus and usually to break down de facto segregation of public schools.

Note

A Supreme Court decision in 1971 ruling that busing was an appropriate means of achieving integrated schools (see integration) was received with widespread, sometimes violent, resistance, particularly among whites into whose neighborhoods and schools black children were to be bused. In 1991, the Court ruled that school districts could end busing if they had done everything “practicable” to eliminate the traces of past discrimination.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.