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cade

2
[keyd]
adjective
  1. Eastern New England and British. (of the young of animals) abandoned or left by the mother and raised by humans: a cade lamb.
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Origin of cade

2
1425–75; late Middle English cad(e), of obscure origin
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for cader

Historical Examples of cader

  • A well-known projection on the flanks of Cader is the Giant's Nose.

    The Motor Routes of England

    Gordon Home

  • This makes it, according to Pennant, 240 yards higher than Cader Idris.

    Ten Thousand Wonderful Things

    Edmund Fillingham King

  • We reached Cader Fronwen, one of the highest of the Berwyns, without meeting with a trace.

  • The fourth hole is known to all Aberdoveyites as Cader, and is as good a specimen of the blind short hole as is to be found.

  • I don't think my own have even quite recovered the effects of three winters over the base of Cader Idris.


British Dictionary definitions for cader

cade

1
noun
  1. a juniper tree, Juniperus oxycedrus of the Mediterranean region, the wood of which yields an oily brown liquid (oil of cade) used to treat skin ailments
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Word Origin for cade

C16: via Old French from Old Provençal, from Medieval Latin catanus

cade

2
adjective
  1. (of a young animal) left by its mother and reared by humans, usually as a pet
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Word Origin for cade

C15: of unknown origin

Cade

noun
  1. Jack. died 1450, English leader of the Kentish rebellion against the misgovernment of Henry VI (1450)
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cader

cade

adj.

"pet, tame," mid-15c., used in reference to young animals abandoned by their mothers and brought up by hand; of unknown origin.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper