calumny

[ kal-uhm-nee ]
/ ˈkæl əm ni /

noun, plural cal·um·nies.

a false and malicious statement designed to injure the reputation of someone or something: The speech was considered a calumny of the administration.
the act of uttering calumnies; slander; defamation.

Nearby words

  1. calumet city,
  2. calumniate,
  3. calumniation,
  4. calumniator,
  5. calumnious,
  6. calutron,
  7. calvados,
  8. calvaria,
  9. calvarium,
  10. calvary

Origin of calumny

1400–50; late Middle English < Latin calumnia, equivalent to calumn-, perhaps originally a middle participle of calvī to deceive + -ia -y3)

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for calumny


British Dictionary definitions for calumny

calumny

/ (ˈkæləmnɪ) /

noun plural -nies

the malicious utterance of false charges or misrepresentation; slander; defamation
such a false charge or misrepresentation

Word Origin for calumny

C15: from Latin calumnia deception, slander

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for calumny

calumny

n.

"False & malicious misrepresentation of the words or actions of others, calculated to injure their reputation" [Fowler], mid-15c., from Middle French calomnie (15c.), from Latin calumnia "trickery, subterfuge, misrepresentation, malicious charge," from calvi "to trick, deceive," from PIE root *kel- "to deceive, confuse" (cf. Greek kelein "to bewitch, seduce, beguile," Gothic holon "to deceive," Old Norse hol "praise, flattery," Old English hol "slander," holian "to slander").

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper