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capias

[key-pee-uh s, kap-ee-]
noun Law.
  1. a writ commanding an officer to take a specified person into custody.
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Origin of capias

1400–50; late Middle English < Latin: literally, you are to take, subjunctive 2nd person singular of capere
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for capias

Historical Examples

  • So also said Judge Adams, and Mr. Capias, and all the people.

    Winning His Way

    Charles Carleton Coffin

  • Safe-conduct passes for knaves are writs of capias to honest men.

  • "It is important that he should be arrested on this capias," said Bagsley.

    The Frontiersmen

    Gustave Aimard

  • Viam Francofurdi capias, quam autem hac periculosiorem esse putamus.

  • Mr. Capias was so eloquent that the people stamped till the house fairly shook with applause.

    Winning His Way

    Charles Carleton Coffin


British Dictionary definitions for capias

capias

noun
  1. law (formerly) a writ directing a sheriff or other officer to arrest a named person
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Word Origin

C15: from Latin, literally: you must take, from capere
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for capias

n.

writ of arrest issued by a court, mid-15c., from Latin capias, literally "thou mayest take," typical first word of such a writ; properly 2nd person singular present subjunctive of capere "to catch, seize, hold" (see capable).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper