cardoon

[kahr-doon]
noun
  1. a composite plant, Cynara cardunculus, of the Mediterranean area, having a root and leafstalks eaten as a vegetable.
Also car·don [kahr-dohn] /kɑrˈdoʊn/.

Origin of cardoon

1605–15; < Middle French cardon < Old Provençal < Medieval Latin cardōn-, stem of cardō, for Latin card(u)us thistle, cardoon
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for cardon

Contemporary Examples of cardon

  • And Cardon told Politico last week, “I think Jeff and I are both quality gentlemen who will keep it to the issues.”

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Other Mormon Primary

    McKay Coppins

    August 11, 2011

Historical Examples of cardon

  • Cardon made a stabbing gesture with the stiletto, which he still held.

    Null-ABC

    Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire

  • "And there is also the matter of Pelton's daughter, and his son," Cardon said.

    Null-ABC

    Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire

  • "Well, we're in a nice puddle of something-or-other," Cardon greeted him.

    Null-ABC

    Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire

  • This Literate can be trusted; he's a friend of Mr. Cardon's.

    Null-ABC

    Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire

  • "And Cardon's gone completely cloak-and-dagger-happy," she continued.

    Null-ABC

    Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire


British Dictionary definitions for cardon

cardoon

noun
  1. a thistle-like S European plant, Cynara cardunculus, closely related to the artichoke, with spiny leaves, purple flowers, and a leafstalk that may be blanched and eaten: family Asteraceae (composites)

Word Origin for cardoon

C17: from French cardon, ultimately from Latin carduus thistle, artichoke
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cardon

cardoon

n.

1610s, from French cardon, from Provençal cardon, properly "thistle," from Late latin cardonem (nominative cardo "thistle," related to Latin carduus "thistle, artichoke" (see harsh).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper