cinnabar

[ sin-uh-bahr ]
/ ˈsɪn əˌbɑr /

noun

a mineral, mercuric sulfide, HgS, occurring in red crystals or masses: the principal ore of mercury.
red mercuric sulfide, used as a pigment.
bright red; vermillion.

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Origin of cinnabar

1350–1400; <Latin cinnabaris<Greek kinnábari< ?; replacing Middle English cynoper<Medieval Latin, Latin as above

OTHER WORDS FROM cinnabar

cin·na·bar·ine [sin-uh-buh-reen, -ber-in, -bahr-ahyn, -een], /ˈsɪn ə bəˌrin, -bər ɪn, -ˌbɑr aɪn, -in/, cin·na·bar·ic [sin-uh-bar-ik], /ˌsɪn əˈbær ɪk/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for cinnabar

British Dictionary definitions for cinnabar

cinnabar
/ (ˈsɪnəˌbɑː) /

noun

a bright red or brownish-red mineral form of mercuric sulphide (mercury(II) sulphide), found close to areas of volcanic activity and hot springs. It is the main commercial source of mercury. Formula: HgS. Crystal structure: hexagonal
the red form of mercuric sulphide (mercury(II) sulphide), esp when used as a pigment
a bright red to reddish-orange; vermilion
a large red-and-black European moth, Callimorpha jacobaeae: family Arctiidae (tiger moths, etc)

Word Origin for cinnabar

C15: from Old French cenobre, from Latin cinnābaris, from Greek kinnabari, of Oriental origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012