Dictionary.com

clathrate

[ klath-reyt ]
/ ˈklæθ reɪt /
Save This Word!

adjective

Biology. resembling a lattice; divided or marked like latticework.

noun

Chemistry. a substance in which a molecule of one compound fills a cavity within the crystal lattice of another compound.

QUIZZES

DO A DOUBLE TAKE ON THIS QUIZ ON CONTRONYMS

Look both ways before you take this quiz on contronyms, or words that can have opposite meanings.
Question 1 of 7
Choose the sentence that uses "rent" correctly.

Meet Grammar Coach

Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing

Meet Grammar Coach

Improve Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help
Compare adduct.

Origin of clathrate

1615–25; <Latin clāt(h)rātus, past participle of clāt(h)rāre to fit with bars, verbal derivative of clāt(h)ra bars, lattice <Greek, Doric equivalent of Attic klâithra, plural of klêithron bar; see clithral

Words nearby clathrate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for clathrate

British Dictionary definitions for clathrate

clathrate
/ (ˈklæθreɪt) /

adjective

resembling a net or lattice

noun

chem a solid compound in which molecules of one substance are physically trapped in the crystal lattice of another

Word Origin for clathrate

C17: from Latin clāthrāre to provide with a lattice, from Greek klēthra, from klaithron a bar
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for clathrate

clathrate
[ klăthrāt′ ]

adj.

Having a latticelike structure or appearance.
Of or relating to inclusion complexes in a chemical compound in which molecules of one substance are completely enclosed within the crystal structure of another.

n.

A clathrate compound, such as urea.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
FEEDBACK