Idioms for come

Origin of come

before 900; Middle English comen, Old English cuman; cognate with Dutch komen, German kommen, Gothic qiman, Old Norse koma, Latin venīre (see avenue), Greek baínein (see basis), Sanskrit gácchati (he) goes
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for come up (1 of 2)

come up

verb (intr, adverb)

British Dictionary definitions for come up (2 of 2)

come
/ (kʌm) /

verb comes, coming, came or come (mainly intr)

interjection

an exclamation expressing annoyance, irritation, etccome now!; come come!

noun taboo, slang

semen

Word Origin for come

Old English cuman; related to Old Norse koma, Gothic qiman, Old High German queman to come, Sanskrit gámati he goes
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with come up (1 of 2)

come up

1

Arise, present itself, as in This question never came up. [Mid-1800s]

2

Rise (from a lower place to a higher one) as in We'll leave as soon as the sun comes up. [9th century]

3

Also, come up to. Approach, come near, as in He came up and said hello, or The dog came right up to Nora. [Early 1700s]

4

Also, come up to. Rise in status or value, be equal to, as in His paintings will never come up to his teacher's, or This officer came up through the ranks. [c. 1600] A variant is come up or rise in the world, used for someone who has risen in rank, wealth, or status; for example, He has really come up in the world—he now owns a yacht, or I could see at once that she was a woman who would rise in the world. Also see the subsequent idioms beginning with come up.

Idioms and Phrases with come up (2 of 2)

come

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.