company

[ kuhm-puh-nee ]
/ ˈkʌm pə ni /
||

noun, plural com·pa·nies.

verb (used without object), com·pa·nied, com·pa·ny·ing.

Archaic. to associate.

verb (used with object), com·pa·nied, com·pa·ny·ing.

Archaic. to accompany.

Nearby words

  1. companionable,
  2. companionate,
  3. companionate marriage,
  4. companionship,
  5. companionway,
  6. company doctor,
  7. company grade,
  8. company man,
  9. company manners,
  10. company of jesus

Idioms

    keep company,
    1. to associate with; be a friend of.
    2. Informal. to go together, as in courtship: My sister has been keeping company with a young lawyer.
    part company,
    1. to cease association or friendship with: We parted company 20 years ago after the argument.
    2. to take a different or opposite view; differ: He parted company with his father on politics.
    3. to separate: We parted company at the airport.

Origin of company

1200–50; Middle English < Anglo-French; Old French compaignie companionship, equivalent to compain (< Late Latin compāniō; see companion1) + -ie -y3

SYNONYMS FOR company
Related formscom·pa·ny·less, adjectivein·ter·com·pa·ny, adjective

Synonym study

1. Company, band, party, troop refer to a group of people formally or informally associated. Company is the general word and means any group of people: a company of motorists. Band, used especially of a band of musicians, suggests a relatively small group pursuing the same purpose or sharing a common fate: a concert by a band; a band of survivors. Party, except when used of a political group, usually implies an indefinite and temporary assemblage, as for some common pursuit: a spelunking party. Troop, used specifically of a body of cavalry, usually implies a number of individuals organized as a unit: a troop of cavalry.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


British Dictionary definitions for company's

company

/ (ˈkʌmpənɪ) /

noun plural -nies

verb -nies, -nying or -nied

archaic to keep company or associate (with someone)

Word Origin for company

C13: from Old French compaignie, from compain companion, fellow, from Late Latin compāniō; see companion 1

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for company's

company

n.

mid-12c., "large group of people," from Old French compagnie "society, friendship, intimacy; body of soldiers" (12c.), from Late Latin companio (see companion). Meaning "companionship" is from late 13c. Sense of "business association" first recorded 1550s, having earlier been used in reference to trade guilds (c.1300). Meaning "subdivision of an infantry regiment" is from 1580s. Abbreviation co. dates from 1670s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with company's

company

In addition to the idioms beginning with company

  • company man
  • company manners

also see:

  • keep someone company
  • misery loves company
  • part company
  • two's company
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.