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construct

[ verb kuhn-struhkt; noun kon-struhkt ]
/ verb kənˈstrʌkt; noun ˈkɒn strʌkt /
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See synonyms for: construct / constructed / constructing / constructs on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object)
to build or form by putting together parts; frame; devise.
Geometry. to draw (a figure) fulfilling certain given conditions.
noun
something constructed: Each musical note sign is a construct of three distinct parts: the head, the stem, and the hook.
a mental image, idea, or theory, especially a complex one formed from a number of simpler elements: Character is a construct of personal values, personal rules and morals, and a number of other facets, including self-control and willpower.
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Origin of construct

First recorded in 1400–50 for earlier past participle sense; 1655–65 for current senses; late Middle English, from Latin constrūctus (past participle of construere “to construe”), equivalent to con- con- + strūc- (variant stem of struere “to build”) + -tus past participle suffix

synonym study for construct

1. See make1.

OTHER WORDS FROM construct

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

MORE ABOUT CONSTRUCT

What does construct mean?

To construct means to build or create by putting parts together, as in Val constructed a whole town out of toy building blocks.

A construct is something that is created, often with a complex form.

The verb form of construct, pronounced kuhn-struhkt, is most often used to refer to buildings and monuments being built, but it can be used in any situation where something is built or parts are combined. You can construct a meal, for example, out of ingredients in your refrigerator or construct an outfit out of articles of clothing in your closet.

The noun form of construct, pronounced kon-struhkt, is anything that is built, either literally or figuratively. It is most often used figuratively to describe something that is made up of practices or ideas from a specific philosophy or school of thought. Constructs are often complex theories that are informed by many smaller ideas of the way things work.

Example: The gas company tried to construct a new pipeline, but the pipes kept leaking.

Where does construct come from?

The first records of the term construct come from the late 1400s. It ultimately comes from the Latin construere, meaning “to heap together or build.”

The phrase social construct refers to a theory or practice made up by the people in that society. For example, currency is a construct because the people in a society agree that what is used for currency has value and can be exchanged for goods or services. As well, many cultural and societal expectations are social constructs. For example, in the United States the construct of shaking of hands has become a sign of respect for the person you’re shaking hands with.

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What are some other forms related to construct?

  • constructible (adjective)
  • overconstruct (verb)
  • preconstruct (verb)
  • constructor (noun)

What are some synonyms for construct?

What are some words that share a root or word element with construct?

What are some words that often get used in discussing construct?

How is construct used in real life?

Construct is most commonly used to mean “to build,” either literally or figuratively.

 

Try using construct!

Which of the following is NOT a synonym for construct?

A. destroy
B. build
C. create
D. design

How to use construct in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for construct

construct

verb (kənˈstrʌkt) (tr)
to put together substances or parts, esp systematically, in order to make or build (a building, bridge, etc); assemble
to compose or frame mentally (an argument, sentence, etc)
geometry to draw (a line, angle, or figure) so that certain requirements are satisfied
noun (ˈkɒnstrʌkt)
something formulated or built systematically
a complex idea resulting from a synthesis of simpler ideas
psychol a model devised on the basis of observation, designed to relate what is observed to some theoretical framework

Derived forms of construct

constructible, adjectiveconstructor or constructer, noun

Word Origin for construct

C17: from Latin constructus piled up, from construere to heap together, build, from struere to arrange, erect
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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