crocodile

[ krok-uh-dahyl ]
/ ˈkrɒk əˌdaɪl /

noun

any of several crocodilians of the genus Crocodylus, found in sluggish waters and swamps of the tropics.
any reptile of the order Crocodylia; crocodilian.
the tanned skin or hide of these animals, used in the manufacture of luggage and accessories, as belts, shoes, and wallets.
Chiefly British. a file of people, especially schoolchildren, out for a walk.
Archaic. a person who makes a hypocritical show of sorrow.

Origin of crocodile

1250–1300; < Latin crocodīlus < Greek krokódeilos crocodile, originally a kind of lizard, said to be equivalent to krók(ē) pebble + -o- -o- + drîlos, dreîlos worm (though attested only in sense “penis”), with r lost by dissimilation replacing Middle English cocodrille < Medieval Latin cocodrilus

OTHER WORDS FROM crocodile

croc·o·dil·oid [krok-uh-dil-oid, krok-uh-dahy-loid] /ˌkrɒk əˈdɪl ɔɪd, ˈkrɒk əˌdaɪ lɔɪd/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for crocodile

British Dictionary definitions for crocodile

crocodile
/ (ˈkrɒkəˌdaɪl) /

noun

any large tropical reptile, such as C. niloticus (African crocodile), of the family Crocodylidae: order Crocodilia (crocodilians). They have a broad head, tapering snout, massive jaws, and a thick outer covering of bony plates
any other reptile of the order Crocodilia; a crocodilian
  1. leather made from the skin of any of these animals
  2. (as modifier)crocodile shoes
British informal a line of people, esp schoolchildren, walking two by two

Word Origin for crocodile

C13: via Old French, from Latin crocodīlus, from Greek krokodeilos lizard, ultimately from krokē pebble + drilos worm; referring to its fondness for basking on shingle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012